AMPS Seminars and Related Events

2014 Seminar Series

Browse seminars from previous years


Musical Memories: How Experience and Expectations Affect Music Perception
Speaker : Professor Kate Stevens
Time :5pm
Date :15th Sep 2014
Downloads :Click for info
Location :Recital Hall West. Sydney Conservatorium of Music.

Abstract:

The Sydney Conservatorium of Music proudly presents the Public Lecture series, "About Music". Our program is scheduled for Mondays at 5pm and continues throughout Semester 2.

The next lecture in our series " Musical Memories: How Experience and Expectations Affect Music Perception", 15th September (next Monday) is presented by Catherine Stevens, Professor in Psychology and leader of the Music Cognition and Action research program in the MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney (UWS)..

Even without formal training in music, humans develop expectations for the conventions of the musical environment in which they are raised. The influence of this “mere exposure” on responding to rhythmic patterns will be discussed, together with the effect of language background on perceiving speech and music.

Professor Stevens conducts basic research into the learning and recognition of complex sequential, non-verbal patterns using the familiar and universal contexts of music and dance. She is author of more than 170 articles, book chapters, and conference proceedings papers, among them an ebook on creativity and cognition in contemporary dance.


Entry is free and complimentary refreshments are available after the lecture.

Link: http://music.sydney.edu.au/research/research-activities/about-music-lecture-series/

Contact: Joseph Toltz – 9351 1214 – scm_research@sydney.edu.au


AMPS / MMW Seminar
Speaker : Joke Bradt, PhD, MT-BC. Drexel University, Department of Creativ
Time :Vocal Music Therapy: An Embodied Approach to Chronic Pain Manage
Date :11th Sep 2014
Location :Old Arts Theatre B, Melbourne University, Parkville Campus

Abstract:

This presentation will introduce the attendees to the use of vocal music therapy (VMT) for chronic pain management. Through clinical examples and video segments of actual VMT session, Dr. Bradt will discuss how vocal music therapy activates mechanisms that play an important role in the management of chronic pain. She will also present the results of an NIH-funded study on the effects of VMT on core outcomes in chronic pain management.

Therapeutic effects of singing
Speaker : Dr Jeanette Tamplin (University of Melbourne)
Time :6pm
Date :6th Aug 2014
Location :Melbourne Recital Centre

Abstract:

Public Lecture Series
Presented by Music, Mind and Wellbeing

Admission: Free, bookings essential

Bookings: Online at the Melbourne Recital Centre:
http://www.melbournerecital.com.au/events/series/mind/

Awareness of the social, psychological, and physical health benefits of singing has increased significantly over the past decade. Singing has been reported to improve mood, decrease stress hormone levels, facilitate social connection, and even boost immune function. In this presentation, Jeanette will share findings from her research into the therapeutic application of singing in rehabilitation and discuss the benefits of singing as an accessible, non-invasive and cost-effective way to improve health and wellbeing.

Memories are Made of This: Exploring the Psychology of Learning and Memory in Music and Dance
Speaker : Prof. Kate Stevens (MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydne
Time :6pm
Date :30th Jun 2014
Location :Melbourne Recital Centre

Abstract:

Our brains have a remarkable capacity to learn. This presentation discusses processes of learning and memory in music and dance, with an emphasis on learning without formal instruction. Can we learn without conscious awareness? What cues from the environment become part of our long-term memory? How does the early learning of a “tonal” language, such as Thai, affect perception of music? When is silence “golden” in learning and remembering?

Public Lecture Series
Melbourne Recital Centre

Presented by Music, Mind and Wellbeing at the University of Melbourne.

Admission: Free, bookings essential
Bookings: Online - http://www.melbournerecital.com.au/events/series/mind/

Songwriting to effect changes in self-concept and wellbeing following acquired brain injury or spinal cord injury: A feasibility study
Speaker : Associate Professor Felicity Baker
Time :6-7pm
Date :29th May 2014
Location :Old Arts Theatre B, University of Melbourne, Parkville

Abstract:

Abstract

People who have acquired a brain or spinal cord injury often experience significant emotional upheaval as they begin to process and acknowledge the long-term implications of their injuries. This feasibility study examined the effect of a targeted songwriting intervention on self-concept and wellbeing in adults with acquired brain injury or spinal cord injury. Six inpatients undergoing rehabilitation following a brain or spinal cord injury participated in 12 individual songwriting sessions over 6 weeks. The sessions were designed to support participants to create songs that explored issues of identity – with the aim of integrating aspects of the past pre-injured self with that of the new injured self. Participants created 3 songs – a song about the past self, the present self, and a future self. They completed a battery of pre, post, and follow up standardized measures designed to determine changes in self-concept, affect, anxiety and depression, satisfaction with life, and sense of flourishing. Changes to self-concept and wellbeing were in the positive direction demonstrating the capacity for this methodology to detect changes in this population. Data collection from control group participants is currently under way which will enable stronger inferences about the effects of the intervention. This presentation will discuss the findings to date and illustrate how self-concept changes are reflected in song lyrics.

Speaker biography

Associate Professor Felicity Baker is Australia Research Council Fellow, co-director of the National Music Therapy Research Unit at The University of Melbourne, and President of Australian Music Therapy Association (2011-2014). Her clinical and research expertise are predominantly in neurorehabilitation with a special interest in communication rehabilitation and facilitating emotional adjustment to a changed identity via various music therapy methods.

Music: A Natural Resource for Health
Speaker : Professor Lisa Summer PhD, MT-BC, FAMI
Time :6.15pm
Date :28th Apr 2014
Location :Melba Hall, Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, University of Melbourne, Parkville

Abstract:

Humanistic psychotherapy, positive psychology, and a proliferation of preventive health services have shifted this decade’s healthcare from an approach primarily focused upon curative, disease-focused treatment to a resource-oriented model of care. Evidence-based music therapy interventions will be introduced and the everyday practice of music listening as a natural resource for health and wellbeing will be discussed.

Speaker Biography:
Professor Summer is Director of Music Therapy at Anna Maria College in Massachusetts, USA, and author of Guided Imagery and Music in the Institutional Setting, in which she outlined uses of music and imagery for people who have severe mental illness. She is co-author, with Joseph Summer, of Music: The New-Age Elixir, and editor of Music and Consciousness: The evolution of Guided Imagery and Music, a collection of articles written by Dr Helen Bonny, who was the founder of the method of Guided Imagery and Music.

Admission is free.

Personality Correlates of Music Preferences
Speaker : Professor Sam Gosling (University of Texas, Austin)
Time :6.00 - 7.00pm
Date :3rd Apr 2014
Location :Auditorium, Melbourne Brain Centre – 30 Royal Parade

Abstract:

At this very moment, in homes, offices, cars, restaurants, and clubs around the world, people are listening to music. Despite its prevalence in everyday life, however, the sound of music has remained mute within social and personality psychology.

Presenter Biography:
Sam Gosling is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas, Austin. He did his doctoral work at the University of California at Berkeley, where his dissertation focused personality in spotted hyenas. He is the recipient of the American Psychological Association's Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution. Sam has published broadly on the topics of Internet-based methods of data collection, personality in non-human animals, and on how human personality is manifested in everyday contexts like bedrooms, offices, webpages, music preferences, and social-media; this latter work is described in his book, “Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You” and is based on the idea that we deliberately and inadvertently express our personalities the ways we manipulate and select the environments in which we live and work; as a result, these spaces are rich with information about what we are like.

Book your free ticket for this event be registering via Eventbrite
https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/the-structure-and-personality-correlates-of-music-preferences-tickets-10997209951

Or via the link on the MNI website: http://www.neuroscience.unimelb.edu.au

Exposing the dynamics of the duo: Singers’ and pianists’ collaborative rehearsal and performance
Speaker : Jane Ginsborg (UK)
Time :6:00pm
Date :3rd Mar 2014
Location :Babel-G03 (Lower Theatrette in the Babel Building)

Abstract:

Until relatively recently, research on musicians’ practising and memorising strategies has largely focused on solo performance. Over the past ten years Jane has been exploring different aspects of collaborative musicians’ rehearsal and performance in a series of longitudinal, practice-based case studies involving her own duo. She will talk about these, and other studies involving student and professional duos, and the implications of their findings both for collaborative and individual preparation for performance.

Jane is the Associate Dean of Research & Enterprise at the Royal Northern College of Music in the UK. She has a broad range of research interests and activities, including:
-The social and cognitive processes underlying experts’ individual and collaborative rehearsal and performance.
-Expert musicians’ approaches to practising and memorizing
-Interdisciplinary Research on Singing
to name just a very few.
Jane has published widely, both as single author and in collaboration with other luminary figures in the Music Psychology field.

For more information, check out Jane's website:

http://www.rncm.ac.uk/people/jane-ginsborg